It’s a little ooVoo for all of us

oovoo.JPGA little while ago Scott Monty, one of the brains at crayon, hit me up about participating in a program they were working on for a client Not knowing any better, I said sure I’d give it a try.

That client is ooVoo. What ooVoo is is sort of a video chat enabler, allowing a host to setup a call-in show with up to five participants. Scott and Joe Jaffe invited me to give it a try under the (correct) belief that it’s better to let people use a product that’s being introduced than to just tell them about it and hope they believe you.

So I’m going to be planning when to host a series of chats and will be publicizing them here. After I do that you’ll be able to signup over at MyooVoDay.com. And as you can see from either that list or the one Jaffe put up I’m in some pretty good company in terms of who they’ve asked to give the site and service a spin. If you want to join me you’ll have to download some software but it doesn’t take long.

This should be fun. And ooVoo is making a contribution to the Frozen Pea Fund to Fight Breast Cancer for each one of us that are hosting a show so that’s an added bonus.

More updates to come.

Oh – you’ll also notice that I put up an ooVoo badge on the left hand sidebar that counts down to 2/10, or the launch of ooVooDay.

Budget cuts for Public Broadcasting

The new Bush Budget wants to more or less completely cut federal funding for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting over the next couple of years. Great idea, as long as your goal is to kill all dissenting media voices or at least strip them down to the point where all they can do is reprint official communications, either of which conservatives are likely fine with.

Cloverfield and buzz-building

Portland Press Herald writer Justin Ellis contacted me a little while ago about an interview on the buzz marketing around Cloverfield and, being me, I gladly obliged. The story ran yesterday and is quite good, with quotes and background from myself and a number of others who were following the evolving campaign.

Studios begin to look beyond the golden dem

static6.gifHollywood is realizing older audiences are contributing to the success of their movies and is looking for more ways to market to them according to Variety.

That shift in thinking is due in part to the general shift in demographics that’s taking place as Baby Boomers age and more of the U.S. population drifts over the age of 44. Those older people are also more loyal (in general) to brands and not bounding around to whatever is popular like their younger counterparts.

A number of movies lately have achieved a good deal of success by attracting an older audience with campaigns geared toward them. Movies like The Bucket List, Rambo and others have all brought in older people that are often ignored