Picking up the Spare: WALL-E, Dark Knight and Tropic Thunder

WALL-E

WALL-E has been co-opted by Greenpeace for use in a new campaign that’s meant to highlight the tremendous waste of natural resources that goes on in the production of tissues and other similar products. It’s not an actual tie-in, but the character that’s part of the campaign is unmistakeably inspired by Pixar’s environmentally conscious robot.

The Dark Knight

The Hollywood Reporter revisits the day Heath Ledger died and how it impacted Warner Bros. marketing plans for th emovie.

Tropic Thunder

You can now download the entire half-hour Rain of Madness documentary from iTunes. It’s actually quite funny and manages to raise a desire to see the movie, which I’ve not yet done. There are some spoilers for the movie in there, though, so if you also haven’t seen it consider yourself warned.

Pineapple Express

Silicon Alley Insider becomes the latest site to pick up on the fact that YouTube launched a whopping new ad format for Tropic Thunder, something I mentioned quite a while ago. TechCrunch and BusinessWeek also mention it, as well as NewTeeVee and PaidContent.

Rob Walker also covers Booty Sweat and the rise in the creation of fictional products for movies.

Google: No, we’re really serious about selling TV ads

Google asked AdWeek to remind the audience that they’re still looking to sell TV ads. They obliged.

Seriously, though, if Google can bring some form of measureability to TV advertising then it will be a very good thing. But in order to get to a position of any strength and begin to influence the industry at all they’re going to need more partners and more inventory. Otherwise this is a noble experiment that will amout to very little.

With a little help from my (LinkedIn) friends

Professional social networking site LinkedIn is finding success that’s unfortunately coming at the expense of people’s jobs. The site is turning into a communications hub for Hollywood and other entertainment industry professionals who find themselves out of work as a result of cutbacks at studios. The site is sending representatives to industry events to do some education on what LinkedIn has to offer and how they can use it.

Think that’s a good idea for a story? How much you willing to pay?

The NYT takes a look at spot.us, a site that asks the community to suggest stories that will then be tasked to investigative journalists. The catch is that those who suggest it are also asked to pony up the cash for the investigation or it just doesn’t happen.

Great idea, but I worry that all that’s going to get reported are stories that people *want* to hear about and not those that they *need* to hear about. That’s still the purview of a professional news organization.